Presenters

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Elizabeth Asmis is Professor in the Department of Classics. She is the author of Epicurus’ Scientific Method (Cornell University Press, 1984) and articles on Plato, Philodemus, Lucretius, Epictetus, Seneca, and Marcus Aurelius. Her current research focuses on Roman Stoicism and Cicero’s political philosophy. Her teaching covers Greek and Roman philosophy and literary criticism, and she serves as the editor of Classical Philology.

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Niall Atkinson is the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History and the College. As an architectural and urban historian focusing on the late medieval and Early Renaissance in Italy, Atkinson studies the reception of buildings and spaces to determine what residents thought about their city. The historical urban soundscape is central to his investigation and led to an even more complex project on the phenomenology of architecture through the entire sensorial apparatus of the body, where taste, touch, and smell, as well as hearing and sight, also have an architectural history.

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Orit Bashkin is Associate Professor of Modern Middle Eastern History in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Her publications include articles on the history of Arab Jews in Iraq, on Iraqi history, and on Arabic literature. She is the author of The Other Iraq: Pluralism and Culture in Hashemite Iraq (Stanford University Press, 2009) and New Babylonians: A History of Jews in Modern Iraq (Stanford University Press, 2012).

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Catherine Baumann is Senior Lecturer in Germanic Studies and Director of the Language Program in German. She supervises graduate student lecturers teaching language courses in the College and is responsible for the first, second, and third year curriculum. She is the co-author of the first-year textbook Kreise. Baumann is also an ACTFL certified Oral Proficiency Interview tester and trainer in German who regularly conducts workshops on the OPI and other aspects of foreign language pedagogy.

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Michael Bourdaghs is Professor in Modern Japanese Literature and Chair in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. His research interests include modern Japanese literature, culture, and intellectual history, as well as popular music and literary and critical theory in Japan. He is the author of The Dawn That Never Comes: Shimazaki Toson and Japanese Nationalism (Columbia University Press, 2003) and Sayonara Amerika, Sayonara Nippon: A Geopolitical Pre-History of J-Pop (Columbia University Press, 2012).

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Diane Brentari is Professor in the Department of Linguistics; she studies Sign Language, phonology, and morphology. Currently her work addresses cross-linguistic variation particularly in the differences and similarities among sign languages in the formation of complex classifier predicates. She is also interested in how the mental lexicon emerges in historical time, which includes the relationship between gesture, homesign systems, and well-established sign languages. She is the author of A Prosodic Model of Sign Language Phonology (Cambridge, MA, 1998) and editor of Sign Languages: A Cambridge Language Survey (Cambridge, UK, 2010) and Foreign Vocabulary in Sign Languages: A Cross-Linguistic Investigation of Word Formation (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2001). 

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Benjamin Callard is Lecturer in Philosophy, Co-Director of the Master of Arts Program in the Humanities (MAPH), and the Philosophy/MAPH Coordinator. His areas of specialization are ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology. He also has strong interests in the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language. He teaches the Core Course and the Analytic Philosophy Core Seminar for MAPH students and is responsible for coordinating the interface between MAPH and the Philosophy Department.

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Hillary Chute is the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature. Her work focuses on contemporary American literature, specifically the relationships between word and image, fiction and nonfiction that we see in contemporary comics. Her book Graphic Women: Life Narrative and Contemporary Comics (Columbia University Press, 2010), examines the graphic narrative work of five authors, including Alison Bechdel and Marjane Satrapi, and argues that the medium of comics has opened up new spaces for nonfiction narrative—particularly for expressing certain kinds of stories typically relegated to the realm of the private.

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Steven Collins is the Chester D. Tripp Professor in the Humanities; he teaches in South Asian Languages and Civilizations. His current research interests include gender in the civilizational history of Buddhism in South and Southeast Asia and Pali Buddhist accounts of madness. He is the author of Selfless Persons: Imagery and Thought in Theravada Buddhism (Cambridge, 1982), Nirvana and Other Buddhist Felicities: Utopias of the Pali Imaginaire (Cambridge, 1998), A Pali Grammar for Students (Silkworm, 2006), and Nirvana: Concept, Imagery, Narrative (Cambridge, 2010).

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Fred Donner's research has dealt with the role of pastoral nomadic groups in Near Eastern societies, the early Islamic conquests and the relationship between pastoral nomads and the state. His books include The Early Islamic Conquests (Princeton, 1981), Narratives of Islamic Origins: The Beginnings of Islamic Historical Writing (Darwin Press, 1998), and Muhammad and the Believers: At the Origins of Islam (Harvard, 2010). More recently, Donner's interests have shifted to the intellectual or ideological factors at play in the early expansion of Islam, particularly the significance of militant piety, possibly rooted in an apocalyptic outlook.

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Associate Professor Sascha Ebeling was trained in South Asian Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures, and General Linguistics at the University of Cologne, Germany, and the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), London. He was the recipient of the 2007 Forschungspreis (Research Award) of the Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft (German Oriental Society) for his work on nineteenth-century Tamil literature; he also received the 2008 Whiting Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Core teaching at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Colonizing the Realm of Words: The Transformation of Tamil Literature in Nineteenth-Century South India (SUNY Press, 2010).

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Martha Feldman is the Mabel Greene Myers Professor of Music and the Humanities in the College. Her many honors include the Dent Medal from the Royal Musical Association in 2001, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2006, and the Ruth A. Solie Prize of the American Musicological Society in 2007. She was the Ernst Bloch Visiting Professor and Lecturer at the University of California at Berkeley in 2007. Her latest book, Opera and Sovereignty: Transforming Myths in Eighteenth-Century Italy (University of Chicago Press, 2007) won the Laing Prize for 2010. Other books include City Culture and the Madrigal at Venice (University of California Press, 1995, winner of the Bainton Prize of the Sixteenth Century Conference), The Courtesan's Arts: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (coedited, Oxford University Press, 2006), and various musical editions. She is currently working on two books. The Castrato in Nature (forthcoming from University of California Press) investigates different relationships of castrati to nature, non-nature, and innate kinds. A second book, The Castrato’s Tale, is planned as a study of the interplay of myth and narrative in castrato autobiography.

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Frances Ferguson is Ann L. and Lawrence B. Buttenwieser Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature. Her research focuses on the literary field of the eighteenth century and Romanticism and its changes over time (the rise of criticism and reviewing, the changes in the relationship between poetry and the novel), the history of reading and practical criticism, the rise of mass education, and the importance of dissent in educated and educational thought in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She is the author of Pornography, The Theory: What Utilitarianism Did To Action (University of Chicago Press, 2005), Solitude and the Sublime: Romanticism and the Aesthetics of Individuation (Routledge, 1992), and Wordsworth: Language as Counter-Spirit (Yale University Press, 1977).

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David Finkelstein is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy and the College. Finkelstein works and teaches principally in epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of mind. His book, Expression and the Inner (Harvard University Press, 2003), offers an account of the authority with which we speak about our own thoughts and feelings and of the distinction between conscious and unconscious mental states.

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Dr. Melissa Gilliam is an expert in pediatric and adolescent gynecology, helping teens and women age 25 and younger who have complex problems or need routine care. She focuses on providing a youth-friendly atmosphere and is interested in the use of new media and technology. She was named one of the "100 Women to Watch in 2012" by Today's Chicago Woman due to her advocacy for women's health. Dr. Gilliam's research focuses on contraception, family planning, youth development, and sexually transmitted infections. Specifically, she focuses on contraceptive use among teens and women who are at risk for unintended pregnancy. She is the director of The Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Innovation in Sexual and Reproductive Health (Ci3), which unites researchers across the University to examine issues surrounding reproductive health and underlying disparities in access that affect physical, emotional, social, and economic well-being.  

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Amber Ginsburg is a Lecturer in the Department of Visual Arts. Her current practice utilizes her background in ceramics in order to focus on site-generated works, using the specific history of a site as a starting point to unearth narratives from conversations and trips to historical museums and libraries. She also uses the archival nature of ceramics and the patterns of ceramic history to study the connections between use, practice, and museum. 

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Tom Gunning is the Edwin A. and Betty L. Bergman Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies, Art History, and the College. He works on problems of film style and interpretation, film history and film culture. His published work comprises approximately one hundred publications and has concentrated on early cinema from its origins to WWI, as well as on the culture of modernity from which cinema arose. He has written on the Avant-Garde film, both in its European pre-WWI manifestations and the American Avant-Garde film up to the present day. He has also written on genre in Hollywood cinema and on the relation between cinema and technology. The issues of film culture, the historical factors of exhibition and criticism and spectator's experience throughout film history are recurrent themes in his work.

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Berthold Hoeckner is Associate Professor in the Department of Music and the College. He is a music historian specializing in nineteenth- and twentieth-century music. His research interests include aesthetics, Adorno, music and literature, music and visual culture, and the psychology and neuroscience of music. His awards and fellowships include the Alfred Einstein Award of the American Musicological Society (1998), a Humboldt Research Fellowship (2001/2), and a Mellon New Directions Fellowship (2006/7). He is the author of Programming the Absolute: Nineteenth-Century German Music and the Hermeneutics of the Moment (Princeton, 2002).

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Judy Hoffmann is Professor of Practice in the Department of Cinema & Media Studies and the Department of Visual Arts. She has worked in film and video for over 25 years, and her research interests include documentary cinema and video, video and film production, ethnographic film and issues of representation and cultural ownership, and political film and video. She played a major role in the foundation of Kartemquin Films, a non-profit documentary production company, and serves on its Board of Directors. Her documentary credits include The Gates, a documentary on Jeanne Claude and Christo's Central Park installation, which aired on HBO in 2006; numerous PBS series, including Daley: The Last Boss for "American Experience" and Ken Burns' Baseball, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Jazz; a behind the scenes documentary DVD on Britney Spears, called Stages: Three Days in Mexico, and many more. She received her MFA from Northwestern University. 

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Dorothea Hoffmann is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Linguistics. Her work focuses on Australian Languages and Linguistics, in particular Jaminjung, Kriol and MalakMalak. Hoffmann is currently working on a thorough description and documentation of MalakMalak, a highly endangered language with eleven identified remaining speakers based in the Daly River Region in Australia. She aims to complement existing sketch grammars with audio-visual recordings that document traditional stories and culturally significant processes, and by compiling a 2,000-word dictionary.

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Patrick Jagoda is Assistant Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature. His research focuses on new media studies and twentieth and twenty-first century American literature and culture, particularly digital games, electronic literature, virtual worlds, television, cinema, the novel, and media theory. With Melissa Gilliam, Professor of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Pediatrics, Jagoda created the Game Changer Chicago Design Lab, a transdisciplinary initiative that works to create digital stories and transmedia games exploring issues related to health and social justice.

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Gabriel Richarson Lear is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and the Committee on Social Thought whose work focuses on ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. Her book, Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Princeton, 2004), is about the relationship between morally virtuous action and theoretical contemplation in the happiest life. She is currently writing about Plato's aesthetics and the status of beauty as an ethical concept in the work of several philosophers.

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Laura Letinsky is a Professor in the Department of Visual Arts. Her still life photography often focuses on questions of materialism and consumerism, as well as transformation and sensation. Her color photographic series have been shown at museums and galleries including the Yancey Richardson Gallery and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, The Nederlands Foto Institute, The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, and the Shine Gallery in London. Her work has received support from the Richard Driehaus Foundation, the Illinois Arts Council, the Anonymous Was A Woman Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, and the Canada and the Manitoba Arts Council. Letinsky received her B.F.A. from the University of Manitoba and her MFA from Yale University.

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Marko Malink is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy and the College. His work focuses on ancient philosophy, particularly ancient logic, and he also works on logic, philosophy of language, and linguistics. Specifically, Malink’s research centers on Aristotle’s logic and metaphysics, and how Aristotle’s views on essence and prediction can help us understand the modal syllogistic. His book Aristotle’s Modal Syllogistic was published by the Harvard University Press in 2013.  

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Françoise Meltzer is Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor in Comparative Literature. Her scholarship includes work on contemporary critical theory and nineteenth-century French literature. Her book For Fear of the Fire: Joan of Arc and the Limits of Subjectivity (Chicago, 2001) explores the gendering of subjectivity from within the context of Joan of Arc’s trial. As a comparatist, Meltzer integrates German and English literature into her work, as well as French. She has been a co-editor of the journal Critical Inquiry since 1982 and her book, Seeing Double: Baudelaire's Modernity, was published in 2011 by the University of Chicago Press.

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Monica L. Mercado researches nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. women's history and the impact of religion on American culture. Her dissertation examines Catholic publishing and women's reading practices after the Civil War, using books and reading to demonstrate the ways in which gender, cultural and devotional life, and class mobility were inextricably linked for American Catholics by the turn of the century. During the 2012-2013 academic year, she was a Dissertation Fellow in residence at the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, where she is also a director of the public history project "Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles: A History of LGBT Life at the University of Chicago." Over the past several years, she has taught courses in U.S. history and gender studies at the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois-Chicago. She holds a B.A. from Barnard College and a M.A. from the University of Chicago.

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W.J.T. Mitchell is the Gaylord Donnelley Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of English Language & Literature, the Department of Art History, and the College, and he is the editor of Critical Inquiry. A scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature, Mitchell is associated with the emergent fields of visual culture and iconology (the study of images across the media). He is known especially for his work on the relations of visual and verbal representations in the context of social and political issues. He has been the recipient of numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and the University of Chicago's Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching. His book What Do Pictures Want: The Lives and Loves of Images (University of Chicago Press, 2005) won the 2006 Gordon J. Laing Prize. His recent publications include Cloning Terror: The War of Images, 9/11 to the Present (University of Chicago Press, 2011) and Seeing Through Race (Harvard University Press, 2012).

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William Nickell is Assistant Professor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. His research concerns Russian cultural history, but has often focused on Tolstoy. His first book, The Death of Tolstoy: Russia on the Eve, Astapovo Station, 1910 (Cornell University Press, 2010) received honorable mention for the Scaglione Prize of the Modern Language Association.

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Sarah Nooter is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics. She has written articles and reviews on Greek tragedy and modern reception. She is the author of When Heroes Sing: Sophocles and the Shifting Soundscape of Tragedy (Cambridge University Press, 2012), and is currently writing a book on comparative drama in Athens and in parts of Africa in the twentieth century. Her interests include Greek drama, archaic poetry, literary theory, and contemporary poetry and theater. She is Book Review Editor of Classical Philology.

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Peter O'Leary graduated from the College and the Divinity School and is a Lecturer with the Committee on Creative Writing. He has published four books of poetry, Phosphorescence of Thought (Cultural Society, 2013), Luminous Epinoia (Cultural Society, 2010), Depth Theology (Georgia, 2006), and Watchfulness (Sputen Duyvil, 2001) as well as a book of literary criticism, Gnostic Contagion: Robert Duncan & the Poetry of Illness (Welseyan). As Ronald Johnson's literary executor, he has edited three books: To Do As Adam Did: Selected Poems (Talisman), The Shrubberies (Flood), and Radi Os (Flood). Two new Ronald Johnson books, The Outworks and a new edition of ARK, are both forthcoming from Flood. Likewise, Is Music, a book of selected poems of John Taggart, which he edited, was published by Copper Canyon in 2010. He is a longtime editor of LVNG, an advisory editor for the Cultural Society, and an integral member of the Chicago Poetry Project.

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Gina Olson is Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS) and Project Director for "Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles: A History of LGBTQ Life at the University of Chicago." She manages the administration and operation of CSGS and oversees the organization of the Center's conferences, series, seminars, lectures, and other programs. Her interests include gender and racial justice, sexual liberation and reproductive justice, community building and world making, film and media, human rights, and Latin American politics and culture. She is a cofounder of the activist group Queer to the Left and for several years was president of the board of directors for Women in the Director's Chair. 

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Geof Oppenheimer is Associate Professor of Practice in the Department of Visual Arts. His practice takes an interest in the ways political and social structures are encoded in images and objects, and how meaning is formed in the modern world. A sculptor by training, he works across multiple mediums including stage set, video productions and photography. His work has been exhibited in a variety of venues including MOMA PS1 in New York, The Contemporary in Baltimore, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, SITE Santa Fe, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, the Aspen Art Museum, and AGORA 4th Athens Biennale.

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Thomas Pavel is the Gordon J. Laing Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the Committee on Social Thought. His scholarship includes works on the theory of fiction, the history of the European novel, Renaissance literature, and French seventeenth and twentieth-Century literature and intellectual life. A native of Romania, he earned his Ph.D. at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris and has taught at various schools in Europe, Canada and the U.S. His books Fictional Worlds and Le Mirage linguistique have been translated into several languages. Professor Pavel also writes fiction in French (Le Miroir persan, La sixième branche).

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William Pope.L is Associate Professor in the Department of Visual Arts. He is a prolific interdisciplinary artist and the recipient of many grants and awards, including the Guggenheim Fellowship, NEA fellowships, and the USA Fellowship in Visual Arts. He is perhaps best known for his provocative performances, such as ATM Piece, and his decades-long series of crawls across New York City, which commemorated in eRacism, a retrospective that showed at several prominent museums and galleries. The Black Factory, his most recent project, toured the East Coast and the Midwest.
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Srikanth Reddy is Associate Professor in the Department of English and the College. He works primarily in the field of poetry and poetics, with an emphasis on creative writing. He is particularly interested in the intersection of critical and creative practice, and in the institutional history that has come to segregate those endeavors. His scholarly work focuses on Modernism and contemporary poetry and poetics. Related interests include ekphrasis, lyric genres, and various historical approaches toward the epic. His book-length poem Voyager was published by the University of California Press in 2011.

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Howard Sandroff is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Music and Director of the Computer Music Studio. He is a composer, performer and sound artist who has pioneered the use of computers and electronics for live musical performance. His compositions for soloists, mixed chamber ensembles, and orchestra often include live or pre-recorded electronics and have been performed, broadcast, and recorded all over the world. In addition to his work at the University of Chicago, Sandroff is currently Professor of Sound Art with the Department of Audio Arts & Acoustics of Columbia College Chicago. 

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Haun Saussy is University Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature. His interests include Classical Chinese poetry and commentary, literary theory, comparative study of oral traditions, problems of translation, pre-twentieth-century media history, ethnography, and ethics of medical care. His books and articles touch on topics such as the imaginary universal languages of Athanasius Kircher, Chinese musicology, the great Qing-dynasty novel Honglou meng, the current situation and theoretical perplexities of comparative literature, the history of the idea of oral literature, Haitian poetry, health care for the global poor, and contemporary art. He is currently working on a book about the concept of rhythm in psychology, linguistics, literature and folklore.

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Jennifer Scappettone is Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature. Her research and teaching interests span the nineteenth through twenty-first centuries, with particular interest in the way Anglo-American and European languages and aesthetics register changes in the coordinates of space, time, and attention. She is the editor and translator of Locomotrix: Selected Poetry and Prose of Amelia Rosselli (University of Chicago Press, 2012), and the author of Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice, which is forthcoming from the Columbia University Press. 

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Bart Schultz is Senior Lecturer in Humanities (Philosophy), Special Programs Coordinator for the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies, and Executive Director of the Civic Knowledge Project. He has taught in the College at the University of Chicago for 24 years, designing a wide range of courses for the College Core as well as courses on John Dewey, Political Philosophy, and Happiness. He has also published widely in philosophy. His book Henry Sidgwick: Eye of the Universe (Cambridge, 2004) won the American Philosophical Society’s prestigious Jacques Barzun Prize in Cultural History for 2004. Other publications include Essays on Henry Sidgwick (Cambridge, 1992) and Utilitarianism and Empire (Lexington, 2005). Schultz has worked extensively in adult education and community connections. He has been instrumental in helping the University of Chicago develop affordable, high-quality educational programs for disadvantaged communities on Chicago’s South Side. 

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Ed Shaughnessy is the Lorraine J. and Herrlee G. Creel Distinguished Service Professor of Early China in the Department of East Asian Languages & Civilizations and the College, and the Director of the Creel Center for Chinese Paleography. He is an expert in the cultural and literary history of China’s Zhou period, with a special interest in archaeologically recovered textual materials such as oracle-bone and bronze inscriptions and bamboo-strip manuscripts. His books include Ancient China: Life, Myth and Art (Duncan Baird, 2005), a popular overview of China to the mid-Tang; Gu Shi Yi Guan (2005), a collection of his Chinese essays; and Rewriting Early Chinese Texts (SUNY Press, 2006), an exploration of how editors have fashioned texts, especially those originally written on bamboo strips.

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Eric Slauter is Associate Professor in English Language and Literature and Director of the Scherer Center for the Study of American Culture. Specializing in the cultural, intellectual, and literary history of early America, his scholarly work examines transformations in eighteenth-century thought and behavior. His current projects include A Cultural History of Natural Rights in America, 1689-1789, which seeks to explain how and why ordinary people came to believe they had rights, and an edited collection of essays on comparative colonial American studies. He serves as the faculty sponsor for the American Cultures Workshop and is the author of The State as a Work of Art: The Cultural Origins of the Constitution (University of Chicago Press, 2009).

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Olga Solovieva is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought. Her work focuses on the history of rhetoric, performance, and media studies, particularly in their corporeal and material aspects. She is writing a book on Thomas Mann's political writings.

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University staff will lead these tours.

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Ulrike Stark is Professor in the Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations. Her research focuses on Hindi literature, South Asian book history and print culture, and North Indian intellectual history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She is currently working on a biography of Raja Shivaprasad of Benares (1823-1895), a public intellectual, man of letters, historian, and eminent educator in nineteenth-century North India.

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Jessica Stockholder is Professor and Chair of the Department of Visual Arts. She works at the intersection of painting with sculpture. Her work sometimes incorporates the architecture in which it has been conceived, blanketing the floor, scaling walls and ceiling, even spilling out of windows, through doors, and into the surrounding landscape. Her work is energetic, cacophonous, idiosyncratic, and formal—tempering chaos with control. She orchestrates an intersection of pictorial and physical experience, probing how meaning derives from physicality.

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Richard Strier is the Frank L. Sulzberger Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of English and the College and an associate member of the Divinity School. He edits the journal, Modern Philology. His life-long project is to bring together two modes of literary study that have traditionally been seen as antagonistic: formalism and historicism. He is deeply interested in the intellectual history of the early modern period, especially theological and political ideas. Courses taught by Strier range from “Renaissance Intellectual Texts” to “Society and Politics in Shakespeare’s Plays” to “The Religious Lyric in England and America from the Renaissance to the Present.” His most recent book, The Unrepentant Renaissance from Petrarch to Shakespeare to Milton (University of Chicago Press, 2011), was recently awarded the 2011 Robert Penn Warren-Cleanth Brooks Award for Literary Criticism.  His previous books include: Resistant Structures: Particularity, Radicalism, and Renaissance Texts (University of California Press, 1995) and Love Known: Theology and Experience in George Herbert’s Poetry (University of Chicago Press, 1983).

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William Tait is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Philosophy. His research focuses on logic and the philosophy of mathematics and its history. He is the author of The Provenance of Pure Reason: Essays in the Philosophy of Mathematics and Its History  (Oxford University Press, 2005) and editor of Early Analytic Philosophy: Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein (in honor of Leonard Linsky) (Open Court, 1996). He has taught at Stanford, the University of Illinois-Chicago, and Aarhus University in addition to the University of Chicago, and continues to teach classes and lead workshops in his retirement. 

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Arata Takeda is a Feodor Lynen Research Fellow in the Department of Germanic Studies. His work focuses on the social and cultural history of terror, particularly the historical transformation of terror from an aesthetic method to a political strategy. His dissertation, which was published in 2010, challenged the popular view of suicide terrorism as a non-Western phenomenon by discussing salient examples from Western history and literature, and caught the attention of German media. Takeda has been a Lecturer in modern German literature and comparative literature at the University of Tübingen and a Research Fellow at the International Research Center for Cultural Studies in Vienna. 

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Vu Tran is a Lecturer with the Committee on Creative Writing. His fiction has appeared in the O. Henry Prize Stories, the Best American Mystery Stories, A Best of Fence, The Southern Review, Harvard Review, and other publications. He has received honors from Glimmer Train Stories and the Michigan Quarterly Review, and is a recipient of a 2009 Whiting Writers’ Award and a 2011 Finalist Award for the Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise.  His first novel, This Or Any Desert, is forthcoming from WW Norton. Born in Vietnam and raised in Oklahoma, Vu received his MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and his PhD from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where he was a Glenn Schaeffer Fellow in fiction at the Black Mountain Institute.

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Candace Vogler is the David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy. She is the author of John Stuart Mill’s Deliberative Landscape: An Essay in Moral Psychology (Routledge, 2001) and Reasonably Vicious (Harvard, 2002). She has also published numerous essays in ethics, social and political philosophy, philosophy and literature, cinema, psychoanalysis, gender studies, sexuality studies, and other areas. Her research interests are in practical philosophy (particularly the strand of work in moral philosophy indebted to Elizabeth Anscombe), practical reason, Kant’s ethics, Marx, and neo-Aristotelian naturalism.

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Christina von Nolcken is Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature and Chair of the Program in Medieval Studies. She is especially interested in Anglo-Scandinavian relations towards the end of the Anglo-Saxon period and in late-fourteenth- and fifteenth-century devotional texts. Much of her writing has been on texts prepared by the followers of John Wyclif (d. 1384) as part of their program to bring education—and especially religious education—to the people.

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Rosanna Warren is the Hanna Holborn Gray Distinguished Service Professor in the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought and the College. Her second collection of poetry, Stained Glass (W.W. Norton, 1994), received a Lamont Poetry Selection award from the American Academy of Poets. Her most recent book of poems is Ghost in a Red Hat (W.W. Norton, 2011). She is also the author of a book of literary criticism, Fables of the Self: Studies in Lyric Poetry (W.W. Norton, 2008). Among her numerous honors are a Pushcart Prize, the Witter Byner Poetry Prize, the Sara Teasdale Award in Poetry, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her research interests include translation, literary biography, literature and the visual arts, and relations between classical and modern literature.

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Rebecca West is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Service Professor of Italian Literature in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the Department of Cinema and Media Studies. Her research focuses on twentieth-century Italian literature, with a concentration on poetry and prose fiction, and on cinema. Her film courses have included “Women Mystery Writers from Page to Screen,” analyses of film adaptations of such novels as Strangers on a Train, Laura, In a Lonely Place, and The Talented Mr. Ripley, as well as comparative screen representations of masculinity focusing specifically on the types of the “Latin Lover” and the “Tough Guy.”

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Robert Whalen is Director of University Chamber Orchestra. He has been the Assistant Conductor of the Woodstock Chamber Orchestra and Conductor of the Contemporary Music Workshop in Minneapolis. He is a passionate advocate for twentieth and twenty-first century music and has conducted many world and regional premieres. Earlier this year Whalen participated in master classes with the Syracuse Opera and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.

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John Wilkinson is Professor of Practice in the Arts in the Department of English Language and Literature. He has published seven collections of poetry and several works of literary criticism dealing with the peculiar properties of lyric poetry. His teaching interests include the theory and practices of close reading and of glossing, relationships between poetry and visual arts, New York School poetry (Frank O’Hara, Barbara Guest, John Ashbery, James Schuyler), and other mid-twentieth century American poets.

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Leila Wilson is Visiting Lecturer with the Committee on Creative Writing. Her poems have appeared in A Public Space, Denver Quarterly, Poetry, The Canary, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of a Friends of Literature Prize from the Poetry Foundation and an Academy of American Poets College Prize. She received her MFA from Indiana University and her MA from University of Chicago. A former editor at Chicago Review, she teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her book, The Hundred Grasses, was published by Milkweed Editions in April 2013.

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Linda Zerilli is the Charles E. Merriam Distinguished Professor of Political Science and the College and Professor of Gender Studies. Her fields of interest are political theory, feminist and gender theory, gender and politics. She is the author of Signifying Woman (Cornell University Press, 1994), Feminism and the Abyss of Freedom (University of Chicago Press, 2005), and articles on subjects ranging across feminist thought, the politics of language, aesthetics, and Continental philosophy. Her current book project is titled Toward a Democratic Theory of Judgment. She has been a Fulbright Fellow, a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, and a Stanford Humanities Center Fellow. Professor Zerilli has served on the executive committee of Political Theory and is currently serving on the editorial boards of Philosophy and Rhetoric, Constellations, and Culture, Theory, and Critique.